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Articles Archive - Veterinary

This Archive includes the best of the Veterinary articles featured on Working Dogs Cyberzine since 1996.
  • Ehrlichiosis information - Provided by - VetCentric.com

  • Lyme Disease information - Provided by VetCentric.com

  • Don’t Get Ticked Off - Written by: Erin Harty, Associate Editor - VetCentric.com
    You’re minding your own business, absent-mindedly scratching Rover behind the ears as you read the morning paper, when something grabs your attention. Did you just feel a bump?

  • Just What Are "Tick Titers" Anyway?-by Celeste A. Clements, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM - VetCentric.com
    With the advent of warm weather, our animal companions are at higher risk for exposure to ticks, arachnids that carry a wide array of diseases’ some of which are serious.

  • The use of Oxytocin during the Whelping of a litter- Written by: Fred Lanting

  • The Canine Working Class - Written by: Erin Harty, Staff Writer - VetCentric.com
    For the vast majority of dogs, life is eat, sleep and play. For some, though, work is also a factor of daily life. Dogs can have a variety of job descriptions: helping police officers on patrol, keeping a farmer’s sheep or cattle in line, searching out victims of natural disasters, retrieving quarry for hunters, assisting the disabled, and even sniffing out drugs, smuggled goods, and explosives. Being a pet dog may seem to be a lucky lot in life, but are working dogs worse off than their more coddled cousins? It turns out that, in some ways, they’ve got it even better.

  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy Illustrated- Provided by - VetCentric.com

  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy - Written by: Fred Lanting
    The pup the Smiths bought was a very promising individual with a great pedigree. Here, they hoped, was the foundation of their successful showing and breeding future. But in a matter of a couple of weeks, a previously unnoticed cowhocked condition developed and worsened. They shrugged this off, having heard that dogs with "extreme" rear angulation sometimes develop loose hock action between 2 and 6 months of age. The pup will outgrow it, they thought.

  • Another Look at Dewclaws - Written by: Fred Lanting
    Some breed magazines a few years ago carried a short article by Doctors Foster and Smith on dewclaws. Now, these are good vets and good businessmen as well as lovers of dogs, and besides, one of them looks a little like me, so they must be really good, right? However, I would like to give another side of the picture than their surgeon’s view, that of the breeder, handler, trainer, naturalist, and judge.

  • CORONAVIRUS ENTERITIS, VIRAL ENTERITIS - Provided by - VetCentric.com

    Corona Explained, including treatment, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  • IS YOUR DOG’S PROSTATE MAKING HIM PROSTRATE?
    Written by: Celeste A. Clements, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM

    Your Dog can suffer from Prostrate problems as well. Prostatic infection may be fatal, and should be considered for the prostrate, intact male dog with fever, abdominal pain and an enlarged or painful prostate.

  • New Advanced Canine First Aid We recently reviewed a New Advanced Canine First Aid book, video and kit. We found it to be the most comprehensive system we have seen, it even includes some prescription meds. Read the Full Review.

  • Dr. De Boer on Kennel Cough and the Working Dog We have added another excellent article to Dr. De Boer's Archives on Kennel Cough, this is a must read for anyone with dogs! Read the Article

  • Working Dogs Veterinary Center Opens! Whether your dog works as a Police K9, Assistance Dog, SAR, Herding, or competes in Schutzhund or other sports, we have felt that one of the features that our visitors really need is the ability to "Ask a veterinarian". Workingdogs.com gets between 10-20 medical related questions a week, so we decided the best thing would be to open a vet center for the Working Dog.
    Dr. Randy Acker is hosting Question and Answer Forums on the topics of Canine Trauma, Orthopedic questions, and Working Dog and Sports Medicine. Dr. Acker is the first of several veterinarians which will be joining our new center, so be sure to check back often to see which new areas we add. Get Detailed Information

  • ASPCA NAPCC WARNING It seems with all the publicity that it gets, people would be more cautious with Antifreeze.
    But every year scores of dogs are poisened with it. This article also contains emergency phone numbers. Read More...

  • Medial and lateral patellar luxation Patellar luxation is usually a congenital condition in which the kneecap, or patella, dislocates outside of its normal trochlear groove. Dislocation, clinically referred to as luxation, can occur on either the medial, or inside surface, or the lateral, or outside surface, of the knee. Read More...

  • Bad Medicine The 18th century Venetian adventurer, romancer, and alchemist Giovanni Casanova reportedly said, "In the hands of the wise, poison is medicine. In the hands of a fool, medicine is poison."

    And in the hands of a pet owner who isn’t careful, the wrong kind of medicine can have disastrous consequences. Read More...

  • Canine hip dysplasia A interesting article that has a great illustration of hip replacement.

    Difficult to prevent and treat, canine hip dysplasia is among the most studied and the most frustrating diseases in veterinary medicine. Read More...

  • Macadamia Nuts, other Holiday Gifts Pose Serious Health Risks for Animals This holiday season, Mary Postel will not be sharing her Christmas presents with her dog, Elvis. ( Read More...)

  • Prepping Your Pet For the Winter Blues As the temperature drops, people begin taking steps to ensure their health and safety over the winter months warmer clothes, careful driving, a medicine cabinet well-stocked with cold remedies. The risks rise for everyone as cold sets in, and that includes your pet... although you probably won’t sense that as your cat idly watches from her warm spot at the window while you shovel a foot of concrete-consistency snow off your driveway. ( Read More...)

  • Why Does My Dog Cough? A Simple Question, But the Answer May be Complex What’s that noise your dog is making? Why, it’s a cough, of course. Yet, there may be some situations where the forceful noise produced by the dog is so bizarre that everyone is perplexed, including the veterinarian. ( Read More...)

  • When Your Dog or Cat Eats Like a Bird Contrary to pet food commercials, most pets aren’t hugely picky about what they eat. Seriously look at what we feed them. Would it barring some kind of dare with a serious monetary stake get anywhere near our mouths? Not likely. ( Read More...)

  • Veterinarians Point to Acupuncture’s Healing Powers Needles may be indicated for your animal’s chronic arthritis. A lot of them. ( Read More...)

  • Dr. Henry De Boer, Jr. DVM has provided an article on Leptospirosis. Although Leptospirosis has been known for a long time, it is occuring more frequently nationwide, and particularly worse in AL, GA, MA, MI, NJ, and NY.

  • SNAKE BITES AND DOGS In Working Dogs ongoing effort to provide good veterinary information here are some links for Snakebite Treatment for Dogs
    Snakebite Treatment #1
    Snakebite Treatment #2
    Also an article on Snake Avoidance Training

  • K9 EMERGENCY FIRST AID REFERENCE This paper is for Search and Rescue dog handlers who are trained to, at least, the Advanced First Aid and CPR level.
    K-9 First Aid Paper

  • If you travel west of the Mississippi with your dog, you need to read these articles on Foxtail Grass, You could save your dog. These articles should be read by anyone who competed in the recent WDA Nationals in Texas.
    Foxtail Grass Information based on information from Tamara S. Shearer, D.V.M. also Foxtail Grass Article Written by Patty Meade and based on an interview with Doctor Linda Amezcua DVM.
    And finally an article about a disease that your dog can get from a Foxtail entering their body, ACTINOMYCOSIS written by Terry Gosch DVM in San Antonio Texas.

  • Heat stroke and overheating in dogs: treatment & prevention An excellent article by Nate Baxter, DVM.
    And from our Archives
    Dr. Henry De Boer Jr. on Heatstroke

  • Save a Life! Learn Animal CPR For the EMS professional as well as pet owner. Easy to follow chart by Lori H. Feldman, DVM and Henry J. Feldman, MA EMT-M . Also features a downloadable printable PDF version.

  • Feeding the Canine Athlete at Auburn Veterinary School

  • In his newest contribution to the archive of articles for the sporting and working dog, Dr. Henry De Boer Jr. discusses Managing the Working Female During Pregnancy. Learn how to maintain your sporting or working female in good condition and ensure a safe, uneventful pregnancy.

  • Use of oral supplementation to help manage arthritis has demonstrably risen in recent years. In yet another contribution by canine sports medicine specialist Dr. Henry De Boer Jr., he addresses the increased wear and tear on the joints of sporting and working canines and shares current information about Chondroprotective Supplementation for the Working Dog.

  • Dr. Catherine Priddle DVM summarizes Aortic Stenosis, the third most prevalent congenital cardiac disorder in the dog. She shares helpful information about testing and diagnosing affected dogs, determining an accurate prognosis, and the OFA Heart Certification program.

  • Suzanne Clothier, well-known author of a number of training books, collaborates with Veterinarian Sue Ann Lesser in their popular resource manual for healing the injured sporting or working dog, Physical Therapy for the Canine Athlete.

  • In his newest addition to the DeBoer Archives, Dr. Hank DeBoer, Schutzhund trainer, championship competitor, and nationally recognized sporting and working dog veterinarian, shares his expertise and recommendations for successfully evaluating, treating, and using humane judgment when training the dog affected by canine hip dysplasia.

  • Dr. George M. Strain of Louisiana State University reviews how the dog is tested for hearing ability. He provides a comparison chart demonstrating the differences in hearing frequency ranges in several species in his summary article How Well Do Dogs and Other Animals Hear?

  • Oregon State University and the US Environmental Protection Agency come together as the National Pesticides Telecommunications Network, providing factual data about commonly used pesticides for consumers. Insecticides often found in flea sprays -- such as Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids -- are profiled in their library of fact sheets with ingredients, recommended applications, and toxicity warnings.

  • The Canine Health web site features a helpful list of online resources about poisonous plants and how they affect dogs and other animals. Photos, common and scientific plant names, toxicity, diagnosis, and treatment are all covered on these indispensable reference sites.

  • University of Florida Oncology Department shares comparative data for radiation, chemotherapy, and amputation treatment protocols and recomendations in Mast Cell Tumor (MCT) Treatment Update 1999.

  • Alyson Lockwood, SRN, RMN Article on Haemophilia A in the German Shepherd Dog.

  • Medication Chart for Senior and Geriatric Dogs features information about different medications for chronic conditions and relevant warnings and precautions.

  • The University of Florida Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital provides helpful suggestions for successfully battling the ubiquitous flea in their informative article Roger's Tips About Fleas.

  • The Internet reveals some helpful information about degenerative spinal myelopathy, and we've collected some of the best links on our Degenerative Spinal Myelopathy On-line Resources page.

  • The Senior Dogs Project discusses what to expect and how to treat common physiological developments in the aging dog in Caring for the Older Dog.

  • Veterinary Ophthalmologist Dr. Michael Zigler reviews current treatments for Chronic Superficial Keratitis (Pannus). This disease of the eye is seen most commonly in the German Shepherd Dog. An immune mediated disease, it remains incurable but it can be successfully managed by treatment.

  • Marina Zacharias discusses some of the effects of chlorinated water, both when ingested by your pet and when applied topically, in her article Chlorinated Water: A Big No-No! published in the Natural Rearing Newsletter.

  • Susan Gayle Wynn, DVM discusses the current debate about vaccination schedules for our pets, discusses alternatives to yearly vaccinations, and ultimately recommends testing for antibodies in Vaccination Decisions.

  • Fred Lanting, internationally known author, SV conformation judge, and Canine Hip Dysplasia expert, interprets the latest news from OFA and provides an informative update on the ongoing efforts to eradicate canine hip dysplasia and other orthopedic problems from the canine gene pool.

  • Multiple Causes of Cirrhosis in Dogs is the focus of a study by Veterinarian Larry P. Thornburg. His research at the Liver Registry at the University of Missouri generates life-saving information about the numerous diseases that can affect the canine liver.

  • Juvenile Renal Disease is discussed in depth by author Susan L. Fleisher as she details first-hand the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of JRD. She provides helpful information about the heritability of the disease and the steps needed to eliminate it from affected breeds.

  • DNA Studies in Doberman von Willebrand's Disease -- Doberman pinscher breeders may now begin eliminating one of the significant diseases in their breed. Professor George J. Brewer shares the excitement of the discovery by him and his colleagues at VetGen of the mutation that causes von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) in Dobermans and the development of a vWD DNA test.

  • Managing Giardia in the Carrier Dog -- Belgian sheepdog owner M. Shirley Chong shares her personal experiences preventing transmission of giardia to unaffected dogs, and detecting and managing the presence of the parasite in carrier dogs.

  • Collie Eye Anomaly is discussed by Smooth Collie breeder Allene McKewen. She explains the nature of recessive genes and how they can significantly affect a breed in a short period of time.

  • Purdue Veterinary School's Canine Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus (Bloat) web site features in-depth information about bloat, and the school's long-term study of risk factors for bloat. GSD enthuasiast Phyllis Rayca recommended this site. It's well worth the effort to pay a visit and learn about bloat, a singularly devastating affliction that can happen with alarming speed and quickly kill our deeper-chested breeds.

  • Dealing effectively with any genetic problem requires an understanding of the relationship between the genes (genotype) and the phenotype. In his article, The Nature of Genetic Disease, Dr. John B. Armstrong sheds light on the differences between true genetic diseases and conformational diseases.

  • Fred Lanting interprets the latest news from OFA and provides an informative update on the ongoing efforts to eradicate canine hip dysplasia and other orthopedic problems from the canine gene pool.

  • DNA Studies in Doberman von Willebrand's Disease -- Doberman pinscher breeders may now begin eliminating one of the significant diseases in their breed. Professor George J. Brewer shares the excitement of the discovery by him and his colleagues at VetGen of the mutation that causes von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) in Dobermans and the development of a vWD DNA test.

  • Managing Giardia in the Carrier Dog -- Belgian sheepdog owner M. Shirley Chong shares her personal experiences preventing transmission of giardia to unaffected dogs, and detecting and managing the presence of the parasite in carrier dogs.

  • Genetics and the Border Collie is presented by the United States Border Collie Club. From basic genetics to complex genetic traits, the author addresses many of the genetic fundamentals that significantly affect the genotype and phenotype of the Border Collie.

  • Juvenile Renal Disease is discussed in depth by author Susan L. Fleisher as she details first-hand the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of JRD. She provides helpful information about the heritability of the disease and the steps needed to eliminate it from affected breeds.

  • Stress, Infertility, and Herpes Infection in Dogs. A viral Herpes infection can prematurely end a pregnancy and decimate a litter of newborn pups. Veterinarian M. C. Wakeman discusses a number of ways to avoid this deadly viral infection.

  • Pyometria: New Therapy May Be an Alternative to Hysterectomy. John Allinson details the successful treatment of his own dog's life-threatening pyometria with prostaglandin therapy.

  • The Use of Prostaglandin for Pyometritis. Dr. R.V. Hutchinson reviews the causes and conditions of pyrometritis and the successful use of prostaglandin therapy to hasten its cure without having to resort to hysterectomy.

  • Facts About Feet - The importance of sound foot structure and proper foot care can't be underestimated for our working dogs. The Dog Owner's Guide reviews the basics of the canine foot and provides a short list of recommended reading materials.

  • You can order recommended books about canine gait and anatomy from the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Canine Diabetes Mellitus: An Explanation and Current Therapies - Canine Diabetes may be more common than you think. Veterinary Information Services provides an informative review of Canine Diabetes Mellitus (DM), its diagnosis, and current available therapies.

  • The Layman's Essentials of Fluid and Electrolyte Treatment in Parvovirus - Parvovirus can be fatal for dogs of all ages unless vital fluids and salts are replenished. The author presents some common sense procedures for ensuring proper supplemental treatment at home for the dog with parvo.

  • Veterinary Dentistry: Dental Care for Pets - Frank J.M. Verstraete, D.V.M., Diplomate, American Veterinary Dental College, reviews the dental problems seen in dogs and cats, what services the veterinary dentist can offer, and what pet owners should know about their pets' teeth and gums.

  • Canine Genetic Primer - A cadre of genetics professionals collaborated to create an excellent resource for basic canine genetics on the acmepet web site.

  • Why should I have my breeding dogs X-rayed? - The answer is broader than your one pup, or litter of pups, or even your own careful breeding program. The U.S. Border Collie Club explains why in their article Genetic Selection.

  • What's So Big About the Little Thyroid? - Authors Jan Cooper and W. Jean Dodds DVM share an informative review of the canine thyroid -- how it is regulated by hormones, testing protocols, and symptomology of related diseases.

  • Feeding the Working Dog presented by Edmund R. Dorosz, BSA, DVM. The author discusses the role of proper nutrition when developing the highly-tuned working dog during various phases of activity.

  • Multiple Causes of Cirrhosis in Dogs is the focus of a study by Veterinarian Larry P. Thornburg. His research at the Liver Registry at the University of Missouri generates life-saving information about the numerous diseases that can affect the canine liver.

  • Juvenile Renal Disease is discussed in depth by author Susan L. Fleisher as she details first-hand the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of JRD. She provides helpful information about the heritability of the disease and the steps required to eliminate it from affected breeds.

  • Name That Bite - Dr. Jan Bellows, DVM reviews the proper terms to express specific dental conditions and tooth alignment in dogs.

  • Warmer Weather Means Mosquitos... and Heartworm - Norma Bennett Woolf shares an informative summary of mosquito-borne heartworm disease.

  • Canine Hip Dysplasia Resources - We've surfed the web and selected the sites that offer the most comprehensive information about CHD and other canine orthopedic diseases and conditions. With additional information about how open registries will reduce CHD.

  • The Control of Genetic Disease is discussed in a summary of information presented at seminars by Dr. George A. Padgett, DVM, a veterinary pathologist specializing in canine genetics.

  • The Open Disease Registry established by the Institute for Genetic Disease Control in Animals is the first open registry in the United States. Learn how the GDC helps the dog-owning public and responsible breeders identify and prevent genotypic and phenotypic disease.

  • The Canine Ear - an informative review of canine ear problems and solutions by veterinarian Dennis W. Thomas. From the Sport Dogs Northwest Newsletter - Vol. III, Issue 12 - December 1996.

  • Pannus - Corneal Inflammation in the German Shepherd Dog and its treatment is discussed in depth by Veterinarian W. Neumann

  • The Dreaded Bloat - Veterinarian Kathy Hutton discusses gastric torsion, a potentially fatal condition to which deep-chested dogs are particularly susceptible.

  • The Immune System and Disease Resistance W. Jean Dodds, DVM discusses the essential role of the immune system in maintaining general health and resistance to disease.

  • Autoimmune Thyroid Disease - Veterinarian W. Jean Dodds discusses the diagnosis and treatment of this common problem.

  • Heat Stress is a serious concern for working dogs during the hot summer months. Learn how to avoid it and how to treat it.

  • Learn how the National Animal Poison Control Center can help save the life of your dog in an emergency.

  • Acupunture: On Pins and Needles: FDA ruling supports acupuncture; studies confirm success of acupuncture for animals.

  • Open Disease Registry: The Open Disease Registry established by the Institute for Genetic Disease Control in Animals is the first open registry in the United States. Learn how the GDC helps the dog-owning public and responsible breeders identify and prevent genotypic and phenotypic disease.

  • Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats by Richard H. Pitcairn and Susan Hubble Pitcairn. This updated version of the Pitcairns' comprehensive guide to natural health care for pets covers the holistic approach to veterinary care that the authors have applied to the animals they have treated for many years. Their approach is one that promotes chemical-free nutrition, treatment, and natural healing for pets. Of special interest to the owners of working and sporting breeds are the extensive chapters on nutrition, including special diets for special needs dogs. I've modeled the natural food diets for my own working dogs on Pitcairn's recipes with excellent results. You can find this book in the Natural/Holistic Care section of the Working Dogs Book Store. Be sure to check out all of our other best-selling titles at deep discount prices about agility, kennel management, tracking, canine behavior, Search and Rescue, and more!

  • Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet Food by Ann Martin. A phenomenally successful book, the first printing published in October was sold out in the U.S. and Canada in just three weeks. Order now to ensure you receive your copy of the book that investigates and reveals some of the shocking practices of the commercial pet food industry and what your beloved pet is really eating from the food bowl. You can find this book in the Canine Nutrition section of the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook by Delbert G. Carlson and James M. Giffin. One of our most popular titles! "This book is the single dog-related book that I recommend to anyone who asks, and even to those who don't!" says Veterinary Technician Phyllis Rayca. The latest life-saving procedures and information on the treatment of bloat and vaccinations. Easy-to-follow directions, with an alphabetized emergency section explaining how and when to treat a dog and when to call a veterinarian. Only $17.50 in the Veterinary/Health section of the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Canine Hip Dysplasia Resources - We've surfed the web and selected the sites that offer the most comprehensive information about CHD and other canine orthopedic diseases and conditions. With additional information about how open registries will reduce CHD.

  • Canine Genetic Primer - A cadre of genetics professionals collaborated to create an excellent resource for basic canine genetics on the acmepet web site.

  • Dealing effectively with any genetic problem requires an understanding of the relationship between the genes (genotype) and the phenotype. In his article, The Nature of Genetic Disease, Dr. John B. Armstrong sheds light on the differences between true genetic diseases and conformational diseases.

  • Fred Lanting interprets the latest news from OFA and provides an informative update on the ongoing efforts to eradicate canine hip dysplasia and other orthopedic problems from the canine gene pool.

  • Why should I have my breeding dogs X-rayed? - The answer is broader than your one pup, or litter of pups, or even your own careful breeding program. The U.S. Border Collie Club explains why in their article Genetic Selection.

  • The Control of Genetic Disease is discussed in a summary of information presented at seminars by Dr. George A. Padgett, DVM, a veterinary pathologist specializing in canine genetics.

  • Open Disease Registry: The Open Disease Registry established by the Institute for Genetic Disease Control in Animals is the first open registry in the United States. Learn how the GDC helps the dog-owning public and responsible breeders identify and prevent genotypic and phenotypic disease.

  • Collie Eye Anomaly is discussed by Smooth Collie breeder Allene McKewen. She explains the nature of recessive genes and how they can significantly affect a breed in a short period of time.

  • DNA Studies in Doberman von Willebrand's Disease -- Doberman pinscher breeders may now begin eliminating one of the significant diseases in their breed. Professor George J. Brewer shares the excitement of the discovery by him and his colleagues at VetGen of the mutation that causes von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) in Dobermans and the development of a vWD DNA test.

  • Author Ann Martin reviews her newly published book, Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet Food. In her review, she shares her reasons for writing this book about the processed foods commonly fed to our pets. Her factual and often shocking expose of the commercial pet food industry is compelling many to rethink the wisdom of how -- and what -- they are feeding their animals.

  • Animal Health Instructor Kymythy Schultze discusses how the strength of your pet's immune system, its resistance to disease, and its quality of life all depend on the food that it eats. She reviews some of the groundbreaking research into nutrition for our pets and explains the benefits of Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats.

  • Feeding the Working Dog presented by Edmund R. Dorosz, BSA, DVM. The author discusses the role of proper nutrition when developing the highly-tuned working dog during various phases of activity.

  • The secret ingredient is theobromine, and if it's in that chocolate, you'd best not feed it to your dog. Breeder and canine nutrition resource M. Shirley Chong explains the risks of feeding real chocolate to canines.

  • Oregon State University and the US Environmental Protection Agency come together as the National Pesticides Telecommunications Network, providing factual data about commonly used pesticides for consumers. Insecticides often found in flea sprays -- such as Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids -- are profiled in their library of fact sheets with ingredients, recommended applications, and toxicity warnings.

  • University of Florida Oncology Department shares comparative data for radiation, chemotherapy, and amputation treatment protocols and recomendations in Mast Cell Tumor (MCT) Treatment Update 1999.

  • Susan G. Wynn DVM discusses complementary, holistic approaches to Total Cancer Management in Small Animals. Dr. Wynn shares why cancer management depends on many different things, including the general health of the animal, the environment, and the ability of the owner to follow through.

  • Breeder Coreen Kitto offers her suggestions for identifying and remedying Pectus Excavatum or "Swimmer Puppy." This puzzling condition can affect a pup of any breed, and without timely intervention is typically fatal.

  • University of Florida Veterinary School's Canine Vitamin Advisor automatically calculates and suggests the vitamin and herbal supplement dosage for your dog's age, weight, sex, and living environment.

  • Know the symptoms of torsion and bloat and what to do in a life and death emergency. First Aid for Bloat is written by Great Dane enthusiasts but has application to all breeds with a tendency to bloat.

  • The Working Dogs Book Store features over 40 titles in the new Veterinary Medicine Textbooks department. Fertility, obstetrics, oncology, parasitology, and more -- a selection of outstanding medical reference resources for veterinary diagnosis and treatment.

  • The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) provides an outstanding summarization of their hip and elbow certification program in What Happens to a Radiograph at the OFA. Learn how radiographs are submitted and evaluated, and how rating criteria are interpreted and applied by the OFA team of radiologists. Several graphic diagrams demonstrate healthy and compromised hip and elbow joints. A "must read" for those seeking to improve hip and elbow status in breeds affected by joint problems and inherited disease.

  • Dr. Lowell Ackerman, DVM reviews the symptoms of Adverse Food Reactions and explains how to determine if such sensitivities are related to food allergies or to an underlying condition.

  • The Canine Epilepsy Network launches its new educational site with Understanding Your Pet's Epilepsy by Dennis O'Brien, DVM, PhD. Learn all about canine epilepsy, including symptoms, diagnosis, current treatment options, and how to enhance the quality of life for your epileptic companion.

  • Steven A. Melman, VMD studied the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRI) drugs for the treatment of lick granulomas and other potentially destructive behaviors. He details his treatment plans for the study groups and the results in his article Use of Prozac in Animals for Selected Dermatological and Behavioral Conditions.

  • There's a lot of hype and myth out there surrounding the commercial dog food vs. natural feeding debate. Personally, I feed my own dogs a raw, natural diet, and I know from first-hand experience that it can be frustrating trying to find reputable, reliable information about the different diet options available to us. Kathy Partridge presents a common sense, level-headed approach to choosing the appropriate canine diet for optimum health in her article How to Feed a Golden Retriever. The information and personal experiences she relates are relevant to all breeds.

  • After a decade-long search, a Stanford-led team has identified a gene that causes the sleep disorder narcolepsy -- a significant breakthrough that brings within reach the cure for this disabling human and canine condition. Narcoleptic Labrador Retrievers and Dobermans were instrumental in this study and its historic genetic discovery.

  • August launches the exciting new addition of veterinary articles by veterinarian, well-known author and nationally recognized Schutzhund competitor Dr. Henry De Boer Jr. Heatstroke, Elbow Dysplasia Parts 1 and 2, and the Canine Prostate are the first four installments of Dr. De Boer's educational and informative series on the sporting and working canine.

  • MacMillan Publishing has provided online publication of the emergency care sections of The Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Care Handbook. This is an indispensable resource for responding immediately with appropriate critical care until you can get your dog to the veterinarian.

  • Call it "snacking", "snarfing" or just plain poop-eating, most folks would simply rather not know that their dog is committing such an unbecoming faux poo. But a lot of dogs do indulge in the culinary practice known by many as the "Kiss of Death." Veterinary student Erik Hofmeister has embarked on a research study to determine the causes and prevention of Coprophagia in the Canine.

  • It's much more common than we would like to think -- our sporting and working dogs are prime candidates for inhaling or swallowing objects that can choke them, obstruct breathing, and demand immediate emergency intervention. The WWW Golden Retriever web site offers two potentially life-saving reference pages with detailed graphics that will show you What To Do If Your Dog is Choking and How to Perform Artificial Respiration On Your Dog.

  • University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine shares two accounts of dog owners who chose amputation as a treatment for their older dogs' cancers. In Part 1, Owners Weigh Options for Pets With Cancer, veterinary surgical oncologist Dr. Nicole Ehrhart explains why amputation may be the optional choice for a dog with cancer. Part 2, Choices When the Cancer Keeps Spreading illuminates the rigors and realistic expectations of a long-term, aggressive approach to cancer treatment of the dog.

  • Janet Lalonde, D.V.M. stresses the importance of proper conditioning to the training of dogs for competitive events, and reminds us that the quality of physical and mental development allows safe participation in a sport. In her outstanding article The Conditioned Canine, LaLonde details how conditioning, stress, injury and burnout, and human conditioning all affect peak performance.

  • Chris Zink, DVM, PhD is the accomplished author of the two bibles of competitive performance training, "Peak Performance: Coaching the Canine Athlete" and "Jumping From A-Z: Teach Your Dog to Soar." She discusses the importance of understanding locomotion, conditioning, nutrition, and proper training for dysplastic and special needs dogs in Coaching the Canine Athlete. Also online is her revealing discussion of why so many working dogs are overweight in Corpulent Canines?.

  • Dr. Wendy Wallace provides a brief but helpful summary of canine Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) basics. The training season is in high gear -- and so are the opportunities for injury and heat stroke. Now might be a good time to review Canine CPR and share a copy of these potentially life-saving emergency procedures with your training associates.

  • Drs. Altom, Tyre and Cummins of Auburn University studied the impact of different diets on the olfactory performance of canine athletes. In their report, Investigations into the Effects of Dietary Fat Source and Exercise on the Odor-detecting Capabilities of Canine Athletes, their findings suggest that physical conditioning may have the greater influence.

  • Robert L. Gillette, DVM, MSE writes that as physical demands upon the dog's body are increased, so does the risk of injury. He evaluates Performance, Locomotion and Lameness and recommends gait analysis and the physical examination as two diagnostic tools for the veterinary clinician working with the competitive canine athlete.

  • The University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center provides one of the most comprehensive online veterinary cancer resources on their OncoLink Vet site. Your questions about cancer of the dog, and the current methods of diagnosis and treatment, are answered in their extensive library of articles and informative materials.

  • Author Usha Lee McFarling casts a reporter's eye on veterinary medicine today and finds that animals are undergoing brain surgery, kidney transplants and hip replacements as increasingly sophisticated -- and expensive -- medical procedures rival those for humans. Check out the Seattle Times web site for her article, Spending Big to Save a Pet.

  • The GSD PERIANAL FISTULA DATABASE has put together an informative web site with articles, testimonials, and a data-gathering questionnaire to collect more information about this possibly autoimmune-related disease. If you have a dog with PF, or know someone who does, this site is a must-visit for collective information and shared experiences with the disease and its treatment.

  • Dog owners and breeders are increasingly turning to alternative veterinary medicine as a complement to traditional western medicine in their search for optimal care and health of their canine companions. Lori Mikajlo reviews a newly published compendium of alternative and complementary veterinary medicine, COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE VETERINARY MEDICINE: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE by Allen M. Schoen and Susan G. Wynn.

  • Veterinarian T.J. Dunn, Jr. shares a compassionate and educational review of what you can expect should you need to make that most difficult decision -- the humane euthenasia of a beloved pet. In his article on the Pet Center web site, EUTHANASIA: WHAT TO EXPECT, Dr. Dunn provides helpful insight and gentle guidance for dealing with the uncertainty and grief when the time comes to say good-bye to a beloved companion.

  • There are a variety of methods available today that may help us to test for and diagnose the presence or probability of CHD and degenerative joint disease. Two articles debuting on Working Dogs review PennHIP and OFA radiologic protocols for evaluating and predicting CHD. Fred Lanting, canine consultant and author, provides his commentary promoting the PennHIP extraction method, and recommends its use over OFA protocol to screen for CHD. Drs. Keller and Corley, Diplomates of A.V.C.R. and principal radiologists of the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), detail the research studies and scientific literature that support their position that PennHIP stress radiography remains to date an inconclusive method for reliable testing and evaluation.

  • Vicki J. Adams, BSc(Agr), DVM discusses stifle (knee) joint disorders including ligament ruptures and tears and their treatment in her detailed report Stifle Joint Disorders. A brief photographic review of a typical stifle joint surgery and the patient's successful recovery prefaces her article on the same page.

  • Author C.A. Sharp details the exhaustive work on behalf of the Australian Shepherd breed to track Collie Eye Anomaly and eradicate it from the gene pool. Several years of careful genetic study, carrier identification, test breedings, and ongoing breeder education dramatically reduced this significantly debilitating genetic disease of Aussies and other breeds. Author Sharp reminds us why, and how, these efforts must continue.

  • Ehrlichiosis: A Silent and Deadly Killer by Jan Hendricks and Bob Wilson comprehensively details this deadly killer that mimics a host of other diseases and claims the lives of dogs in all 50 states, Canada, Europe, Asia, South America and Africa. Learn all about Ehrlichiosis -- its transmission, detection and diagnosis, its progressive stages, and the appropriate treatments available at qualified laboratories. Many veterinarians are not familiar with Ehrlichiosis or the emerging understanding that it is no longer a rare disease of the tropics.

  • Major Terry Gosch, DVM discusses the threat of foxtails and the systemic disease Actinomycosis that these barbed messengers can transport into a dog's body. Major Gosch lost his own beloved hunting dog to Actinomycosis; his informative report may help others to avoid a similar tragedy.

  • Veterinarian M. Christine Zink has long been interested in dogs and dog sports. Repeatedly asked at canine sporting events and agility trials about structural and medical problems that affect canine performance, Dr. Zink saw an information gap and decided to write Peak Performance: Coaching the Canine Athlete. This book about our canine athletes was first published in 1992, and the completely revised second edition is enjoying significant popularity among competitive sport and working dog audiences everywhere. Find this title in the Training section of the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Canine Hip Dysplasia is essentially a genetic disorder and can only be finally dealt with by carefully selecting non-affected breeding partners. In his article Why Look Into PennHIP?, consultant Fred Lanting discusses PennHIP wedge radiography as a definitive protocol for determining hip joint laxity to diagnose hip dysplasia.

  • Award-winning author D. Caroline Coile, neuroscientist and behaviorist, has written many books and articles about dogs. Her special interests in canine sensory systems, genetics and behavior are reflected in her article about how selection can act on sensory systems in Bringing Dog Vision Into Focus.

  • There is no time to lose if your dog has been poisoned! Dr. Susan Thorpe-Vargas and John Cargill have exhaustively researched the many chemicals and substances that can poison and kill your dog. They've developed an extensive and indispensable guide to common poisonings of the dog, with information about administering treatment that is absolutely critical to the survival of a poisoned dog.

  • Dr. Clemmons' Neuro Chat Room provides and opportunity for German Shepherd Dog and other breed owners and enthusiasts to find out about the newest research and treatments for Degenerative Myelopathy. The DM Newsletter summarizes the weekly discussions and provides helpful information about available treatments for this devastating neurological disease.

  • Lactation in Dogs and Cats by W.L. Hurley, DVM reviews the basics of mammary gland anatomy and canine lactation. Included in his review are the composition of milk, suggestions for optimal nutrition during lactation, pseudopregnancy, and eclampsia.

  • Susan Gayle Wynn, DVM discusses the current debate about vaccination schedules for our pets, discusses alternatives to yearly vaccinations, and ultimately recommends testing for antibodies in Vaccination Decisions.

  • Animal Health Instructor Kymythy Schultze discusses how the strength of your pet's immune system, its resistance to disease, and its quality of life all depend on the food that it eats. She reviews some of the groundbreaking research into nutrition for our pets and explains the benefits of Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats.

  • Marina Zacharias discusses some of the effects of chlorinated water, both when ingested by your pet and when applied topically, in her article Chlorinated Water: A Big No-No! published in the Natural Rearing Newsletter.

  • Veterinary Ophthalmologist Dr. Michael Zigler reviews current treatments for Chronic Superficial Keratitis (Pannus). This disease of the eye is seen most commonly in the German Shepherd Dog. An immune mediated disease, it remains incurable but it can be successfully managed by treatment.

  • Sport Dog specialist Geoffrey N. Clark DVM reviews some of the newer anesthetics introduced to veterinary practice.
  • Author Ann Martin reviews her newly published book, Food Pets Die For: Shocking Facts About Pet Food. In her review, she shares her reasons for writing this book about the processed foods commonly fed to our pets. Her factual and often shocking expose of the commercial pet food industry is compelling many to rethink the wisdom of how -- and what -- they are feeding their animals.

  • The University of Florida Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital provides helpful suggestions for successfully battling the ubiquitous flea in their informative article Roger's Tips About Fleas.

  • The Internet reveals some helpful information about degenerative spinal myelopathy, and we've collected some of the best links on our Degenerative Spinal Myelopathy On-line Resources page.

  • Washington State University shares user friendly, step-by-step directions to efficiently and safely trim your dog's toenails.

  • The Canine Health web site features a helpful list of online resources about poisonous plants and how they affect dogs and other animals. Photos, common and scientific plant names, toxicity, diagnosis, and treatment are all covered on these indispensable reference sites.

  • Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats by Richard H. Pitcairn and Susan Hubble Pitcairn. This updated version of the Pitcairns' comprehensive guide to natural health care for pets covers the holistic approach to veterinary care that the authors have applied to the animals they have treated for many years. Their approach is one that promotes chemical-free nutrition, treatment, and natural healing for pets. Of special interest to the owners of working and sporting breeds are the extensive chapters on nutrition, including special diets for special needs dogs. I've modeled the natural food diets for my own working dogs on Pitcairn's recipes with excellent results. You can find this book in the Natural/Holistic Care section of the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook by Delbert G. Carlson and James M. Giffin. One of our most popular titles! The latest life-saving procedures and information on the treatment of bloat and vaccinations. Easy-to-follow directions, with an alphabetized emergency section explaining how and when to treat a dog and when to call a veterinarian. In the Veterinary/Health section of the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • The secret ingredient is theobromine, and if it's in that chocolate, you'd best not feed it to your dog. Breeder and canine nutrition resource M. Shirley Chong explains the risks of feeding real chocolate to canines.

  • Purdue Veterinary School's Canine Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus (Bloat) web site features in-depth information about bloat, and the school's long-term study of risk factors for bloat. GSD enthuasiast Phyllis Rayca recommended this site. It's well worth the effort to pay a visit and learn about bloat, a singularly devastating affliction that can happen with alarming speed and quickly kill our deeper-chested breeds.

  • Collie Eye Anomaly is discussed by Smooth Collie breeder Allene McKewen. She explains the nature of recessive genes and how they can significantly affect a breed in a short period of time.

  • 1997 Canadian German Shepherd Dog Championship and Seiger Show happens August 1-3, 1997 in Langley, B.C. Check out the schedule of events for one of the biggest national sporting dog events in Canada this year.

  • Dean Calderon took Kenai, Alaska by storm during his Schutzhund Seminar hosted by the Kenai Schutzhund Club. A tremendous turnout guaranteed a variety of handlers and dogs who took advantage of non-stop training action in protection, obedience, and tracking. Check out the action photos!

  • The Lost History of the Canine Race: Our 15,000-year Love Affair with Dogs by anthropologist Mary Elizabeth Thurston revolutionizes how we perceive "man's best friend" and empowers anyone who loves dogs with a new sense of wonder and appreciation. In full color. Only $17.47 at the Working Dogs Book Store. Be sure to check out our other best-selling titles about the fascinating history of the dog!

  • K9 Soldiers Should Take a Bite Out of Bugs eloquently expresses the history and accomplishments of K9 soldiers in the heat of battle. Renowned anthropologist and author Mary Elizabeth Thurston issues a call for recognition of the war dogs and their boundless courage and remarkable devotion to the servicemen they unconditionally served and loved.

  • Fred Lanting, internationally known author, SV conformation judge, and Canine Hip Dysplasia expert, interprets the latest news from OFA and provides an informative update on the ongoing efforts to eradicate canine hip dysplasia and other orthopedic problems from the canine gene pool.

  • Juvenile Renal Disease is discussed in depth by author Susan L. Fleisher as she details first-hand the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of JRD. She provides helpful information about the heritability of the disease and the steps needed to eliminate it from affected breeds.

  • DNA Studies in Doberman von Willebrand's Disease -- Doberman pinscher breeders may now begin eliminating one of the significant diseases in their breed. Professor George J. Brewer shares the excitement of the discovery by him and his colleagues at VetGen of the mutation that causes von Willebrand's Disease (vWD) in Dobermans and the development of a vWD DNA test.

  • Managing Giardia in the Carrier Dog -- Belgian sheepdog owner M. Shirley Chong shares her personal experiences preventing transmission of giardia to unaffected dogs, and detecting and managing the presence of the parasite in carrier dogs.

  • Genetics and the Border Collie is presented by the United States Border Collie Club. From basic genetics to complex genetic traits, the author addresses many of the genetic fundamentals that significantly affect the genotype and phenotype of the Border Collie.

  • Facts About Feet - The importance of sound foot structure and proper foot care can't be underestimated for our working dogs. The Dog Owner's Guide reviews the basics of the canine foot and provides a short list of recommended reading materials.

  • You can order recommended books about canine gait and anatomy from the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • Canine Diabetes Mellitus: An Explanation and Current Therapies - Canine Diabetes may be more common than you think. Veterinary Information Services provides an informative review of Canine Diabetes Mellitus (DM), its diagnosis, and current available therapies.

  • The Layman's Essentials of Fluid and Electrolyte Treatment in Parvovirus - Parvovirus can be fatal for dogs of all ages unless vital fluids and salts are replenished. The author presents some common sense procedures for ensuring proper supplemental treatment at home for the dog with parvo.

  • Juvenile Renal Disease is discussed in depth by author Susan L. Fleisher as she details first-hand the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of JRD. She provides helpful information about the heritability of the disease and the steps required to eliminate it from affected breeds.

  • Multiple Causes of Cirrhosis in Dogs is the focus of a study by Veterinarian Larry P. Thornburg. His research at the Liver Registry at the University of Missouri generates lif e-saving information about the numerous diseases that can affect the canine liver.

  • Feeding the Working Dog presented by Edmund R. Dorosz, BSA, DVM. The author discusses the role of proper nutrition when develo ping the highly-tuned working dog during various phases of activity.

  • What's So Big About the Little Thyroid? - Authors Jan Cooper and W. Jean Dodds DVM share an informative review of the canine thyroid -- how it is regulated by hormones, testing protocols, and symptomology of related diseases.

  • Pyometria: New Therapy May Be an Alternative to Hysterectomy. John Allinson details the successful treatment of his own dog's life-threatening pyometria with prostaglandin therapy.

  • The Use of Prostaglandin for Pyometritis. Dr. R.V. Hutchinson reviews the causes and conditions of pyrometritis and the successful use of prostaglandin therapy to hasten its cure without having to resort to hysterectomy.

  • Stress, Infertility, and Herpes Infection in Dogs. A viral Herpes infection can prematurely end a pregnancy and decimate a litter of newborn pups. Veterinarian M. C. Wakeman discusses a number of ways to avoid this deadly viral infection.

  • Canine Hip Dysplasia Resources - We've surfed the web and selected the sites that offer the most comprehensive information about CHD and other canine orthopedic diseases and conditions. With additional information about how open registries will reduce CHD.

  • A K9 Touches Hearts and Changes Lives - Police K9 trainer Bill Reitz shares how he and his dog Otto spend their "time off" sending a message of hope to kids in crisis.

  • And the Race is On! The 25th running of the world famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is covered in detail on the official web page for "The Last Great Race". Listen to real audio reports!

  • Do Dogs Really Want to Work? The MSNBC network checks in with a variety of opinions from canine behaviorists and trainers.

  • Warmer Weather Means Mosquitos... and Heartworm - Norma Bennett Woolf shares an informative summary of mosquito-borne heartworm disease.

  • French Ring Sport - Bob Dixon details the obedience and agility exercises in this exciting protection sport.

  • Name That Bite - Dr. Jan Bellows, DVM reviews the proper terms to express specific dental conditions and tooth alignment in dogs.

  • Canine Sports Medicine and Surgery by Mark S. Bloomberg et al. can be ordered now from the Working Dogs Book Store.

  • The Immune System and Disease Resistance W. Jean Do dds, DVM discusses the essential role of the immune system in maintaining general health and resistance to d isease.

  • Autoimmune Thyroid Disease - Ve terinarian W. Jean Dodds discusses the diagnosis and treatment of this common problem.

  • The Dreaded Bloat - Veterinarian Kathy Hut ton discusses gastric torsion, a potentially fatal condition to which deep-chested dogs are particularly susceptible.

  • Pannus - Corneal Inflammation in the German Shepherd Dog and its treatment is discussed in depth by Veterinarian W. Neumann

  • The Canine Ear - an informative review of canine ear problems and solutions by veterinarian Dennis W. Thomas. From the Sport Dogs Northwest Newsletter - Vol. III, Issue 12 - December 1996.

  • Canine Sports Medicine and Surgery by Mark S. Bloomberg et al. can be ordered now from the Working Dogs Book Store.



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